Timeline | Before 1800 to After 1930 | FINE AND APPLIED ARTS

Date

Country | Theme | Description

1700 - 1750s


Schwetzingen, Palace and fountains 
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Germany | Fine And Applied Arts

"Palace Schwetzingen" is bulit and flourised under the Palatine Prince Elector Carl Theodor. The baroque castle complex includes more than 100 sculptures and a "Türkischer Garten" ("Turkish Garden") with a mosque, biult from 1779 to 1791, that makes it the earliest mosque- style in Germany and the largest structure of its kind in a german garden. It was designed by Nicolas de Pigage. However the oriental details are not for religious but for decorative purposes.

1770 - 1830

Germany | Fine And Applied Arts

The painting by Johann Heinrich Wilhelm Tischbein, Goethe in der Campagna (1786/87), exemplifies Classicism in art at this time.

1777 - 1810


Drum table in Queen Maria I style 
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Portugal | Fine And Applied Arts

Under Queen Maria I (1734–1816) and King João VI (1767–1826) a new neoclassical decorative grammar replaces the dominant rococo style. Besides French and English influences, the main features of the furniture are the carving of classical inspiration and the inlay work using various woods, creating both geometrical and floral compositions.

About 1790 - About 1850

France | Fine And Applied Arts

As in literature, painting sees a similar confrontation between Neoclassicism (e.g. the work of Ingres) and Romanticism, the latter also influencing sculpture. Academicism endured throughout the 19th century (i.e. Bouguereau, Gérôme and Cabanel).

1790 - 1840

Germany | Fine And Applied Arts

The painting by Caspar David Friedrich, Der Wanderer über dem Nebelmeer (1818), exemplifies Romanticism in art at this time.

19th century

France | Fine And Applied Arts

The arts experience rapid growth with the appearance of new techniques and the emergence of photography and cinema. The female sculptor Camille Claudel was part of this artistic boom. Cultural exchanges with other countries, for example at the International Exhibitions, were extremely fruitful.

19th century

Germany | Fine And Applied Arts

The so-called Moorish style recalls the Islamic art of Spain and North Africa between the 12th and 15th centuries, which it is said reached its zenith in the Alhambra. The style became fashionable in the 19th century for several reasons, but not least that technical progress and 19th-century industrialisation made a change in architectural styles both desirable and possible. As communications became easier and faster and people were exposed to other cultures, different styles and their functions were fused together in architecture, often to display their patron’s affluence as travel and education were still expensive. For example, the Dampfmaschinenhaus (the Steam Pump House) in Potsdam (1841–3) was designed by Ludwig Persius to resemble a mosque and the Moorish Villa (Wilhelma Park) in Stuttgart (1846) was probably built by Karl Ludwig van Zanth in the Moorish style for King Wilhelm I.

1810 - 1880


Dar Ben Abdallah 
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Tunisia | Fine And Applied Arts

Buildings present innovation in their architecture, decoration and positioning. Palaces, patrician houses and mosques incorporate elements of Baroque style; new European techniques and decorative touches that recall Italian arts are evident at the same time as the increased use of foreign labour.

1810 - 1880


Dar Zarrouk 
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Tunisia | Fine And Applied Arts

A new lifestyle develops in the luxurious mansions inside the medina and also in the large properties of the surrounding area. Mirrors and consoles, chandeliers from Venice etc., are set alongside Spanish-North African furniture. All manner of interior items, as well as women’s clothing and jewellery, experience the same mutations.

1810 - 1830


Monastery of St. John at Bigor 
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Republic of Macedonia (FYROM) | Fine And Applied Arts

A masterpiece of Byzantine sculpture, the iconostasis in the Monastery of St John at Bigor near Debar is created in this period by Petre Filipovski Garkata (d. 1854) and his group of craftsmen. Carved in walnut, the iconostasis depicts scenes from the Old and New Testaments and varied floral motifs. This Macedonian master of woodcarving and his associates also executed the iconostases in Lesnovo Monastery.
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